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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

4 edition of Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire. found in the catalog.

Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire.

Gillian Fellows Jensen

Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire.

by Gillian Fellows Jensen

  • 26 Want to read
  • 11 Currently reading

Published by I kommission hos Akademisk forlag in Copenhagen .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England,
  • Yorkshire (England)
    • Subjects:
    • Names, Geographical -- England -- Yorkshire (England),
    • Names, Geographical -- Scandinavian.,
    • Scandinavian languages -- Etymology -- Names.,
    • England -- Civilization -- Scandinavian influences.,
    • Yorkshire (England) -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      SeriesNavnestudier udgivet af Institut for navneforskning, nr. 11, Navnestudier,, no. 11.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPD3576 .N3 no. 11, DA670.Y6 .N3 no. 11
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxx, 276 p.
      Number of Pages276
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5097742M
      ISBN 108750012371
      LC Control Number74169591

      Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Author of Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire, Scandinavian personal names in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, The Vikings and their victims, Care and conservation of manuscripts, Scandinavian settlement names in the East Midlands, Sakrale navne.   In the preface to F. M. Stenton's collected papers Lady Stenton notes that the publication of Anglo-Saxon England in marked the culmination of a life-time spent largely preparing for and writing a book in which ‘place-names, coins and charters, wills and pleas, archaeology and the laws of the Anglo-Saxons were all for the first time adequately used to Cited by:

      Enville (Staffordshire) occurs in the Domesday Book as Efnefeld (Mills, p. ) and Turville occurs in the form Thyrefeld in (Mills, p. ). A few new names were also coined from Norman given names or surnames and English elements. Scandinavian Settlement Names in Yorkshire. Copenhagen, Gelling, Margaret. Signposts to the Past. This was altered by folk etymology into Old English Eoforwic (from the elements eofor ‘wild boar’ + wic ‘outlying settlement’). This name was taken over by Scandinavian settlers in the area, who altered it back to opacity in the form Iorvík and eventually Iork, in which form it finally settled by the 13th century.

      Settlers in Essex & East Anglia. One of the most interesting circumstances connected with the settlement of Essex is the old Kentish colony which formed in the north-east of the county, and was part of the territory belonging to St. Paul`s Cathedral. AEthelbert, King of Kent, was the overlord of Essex in the beginning of the seventh century. Full text of "Place-names of South-west Yorkshire: that is, of so much of the West Riding as lies south of the Aire from Keighley onwards" See other formats.


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Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire by Gillian Fellows Jensen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Civilization England Etymology History Language Arts & Disciplines / Etymology Names Names, Geographical Names, Scandinavian Northmen Scandinavian Scandinavian influences Scandinavian languages Scandinavians Travel / Europe / General Vikings Yorkshire (England) Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Fellows Jensen, Gillian. Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire. København, Institut for Navneforskning (Akademisk. Get this from a library. Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire.

[Gillian Fellows Jensen]. Settlement. Yorkshire itself, says Morris (), was exposed to Scandinavian colonization and rule for nearly a century between the years AD to At the end of the 11th century, from the record of Yorkshire place-names in the Domesday Book, 69% of the locations in the WR were of Anglian origin with the remainder being Scandinavian.

Scandinavian Settlement Names in Yorkshire () Gillian Fellows Jensen - Review by John McN. Dodgson, () Saga Book Vol. XIX at pages to ; Scandinavian Settlement Names in the East Midlands () Gillian Fellows Jensen - Review by A. Perrott, () Saga Book Vol. XX at pages to ; English Place-Names ( Its extent was limited on the north by the broken country which forms the modern county of Durham, for it is only in the extreme south of this county, in Upper Teesdale, that place-names point to a Scandinavian settlement.

In Yorkshire, place-names (see note) indicate that the Danish settlement was confined to the most fertile parts of the county, Scandinavian settlement names in Yorkshire. book the East Riding, the. Scandinavian Settlement Names in the North-West. Introductory. 1: Placenames in by.

Scandinavian habitative names other than those in by word-order Ch SJ Cheshire church clearing cognate OE coined ContGerm Cumberland Cumbria Danelaw Danish denoted DEPN Derby H Domesday Book Dumfriesshire eastern England Ekwall English names.

Toft was Old Norse for a building plot, found in Toft Green, and Gate comes from the word for street: Gata. It’s important to remember in York: Bar means Gate, and Gate means Street. The street where JORVIK is located, Coppergate, comes from its Viking name, Koppari-Gata.

Koppari means cup-maker, Gata means street. "Yorkshire, particularly the East Riding, was subjected to very heavy Scandinavian settlement which may partly account for the paucity of Celtic names" (Faull, 15) In the following text, the terms "Celt" and "British" are employed interchangeably.

References to "Anglo-Saxon" and "English" are similarly equivalent. Scandinavian Settlement in Northern Britain: Thirteen Studies of Place-Names in Their Historical Context (Studies in the Early History of Britain) [Crawford, Barbara E.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Scandinavian Settlement in Northern Britain: Thirteen Studies of Place-Names in Their Historical Context (Studies in the Early History of Britain).

In this book, McLeod does a truly commendable job of pulling a vast and diverse array of evidence from different disciplines into the service of his thesis. Some of his questions and propositions could, and indeed should, prompt a re-evaluation of our understanding, not just of Scandinavian settlement in the ninth century, but also of later.

12 Fellows-Jensen, G., Scandinavian Settlement Names in Yorkshire (Copenhagen, ), pp. –94, discusses the Norwegian presence in the settlements. 13 Cameron, K., Scandinavian Settlement in the Territory of the Five Boroughs: the Place-Name Evidence, Inaugural Lecture (Univ.

of Nottingham, ). Scandinavian place-names of Scotland and northern England are studied together. Essays examine how interpretations have changed in modern scholarship, as well as reviewing the main controversies. The book is illustrated with maps and diagrams and should be suitable for anyone interested in the development of early medieval society in the Author: Barbara E.

Crawford. Where settlements grew up at such places in The Danelaw, we often find the Scandinavian place-name element -ness. For example, Hackness (Hageneise), a village and civil parish in the Scarborough district of the county of North Yorkshire.

SCANDINAVIAN ELEMENTS FOUND IN THE DOMESDAY BOOK. Of all the Scandinavian names, only the two bys are recorded in Domesday Book. In southern Amounderness, then, the place- name evidence points to Scandinavian take-over of established settlements such as Kirkham, Staining, Bradkirk and Mythop, and probably also Ribby and by: 1.

Scandinavian settlement in Yorkshire - through the rear-view mirror Gillian Fellows-Jensen Scandinavian settlement in Cheshire: the evidence of place-names Margaret Gelling Scandinavian settlement in north-west England, with a special study of Ireby names Mary C. Higham Northumberland and Durham: the place-name.

cf Icelandic sleppa, etc., (to become free, to escape, to get off), Norwegian sleip (slippery). It is possible that the Yorkshire dialect forms had the early meaning " slip away". In some parts of Yorkshire, slape ale is a free drink of beer, or beer bought for one by someone else.

Scandinavian suffixes. -BY The commonest Scandinavian suffix found in The Danelaw is -by. Many -by names are to be found in Yorkshire (especially in the east), around the Mersey and the Lancashire coast, and in the central Midlands.

But perhaps the greatest concentration of -by names is in Lincolnshire. Three examples of English village names of Old Norse origin: Lofthouse – lopt-hús (Old Norse) A house with a loft or upper chamber.

Hulme – holmr (Old Norse) An island, an inland promontory, raised ground in marsh, a river-meadow. Towton (“Tofi’s farm/settlement”), pers.n.

Settlement Place Names Home» Names This is the name of a town in West Yorkshire. HARFORD (Settlement) English From Old English heort "hart, Means "Mack's stream", from the name Mack, a short form of the Scandinavian name MAGNUS, combined with Old English well "well stream".

This is the name of a place in Roxburghshire, Scotland. Cultures in Contact: Scandinavian Settlement in England in the Ninth and Tenth Centuries | Dawn Hadley; Julian D. Richards | download | B–OK.

Download books for free. Find books. All in the name. People with Scandinavian names such as Carla, Thurgod, Cytel, Scula, Wicing, Farman are recorded as working in the mints in Exeter and at other Devon sites from the end of the Author: Derek Gore.The Danelaw (/ ˈ d eɪ n ˌ l ɔː /, also known as the Danelagh; Old English: Dena lagu; Danish: Danelagen), as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the w contrasts with West Saxon law and Mercian term is first recorded in .